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Can the #Fixthecountry campaign help Ghana?
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Can the #Fixthecountry campaign help Ghana?

Ghana’s #Fixthecountry campaign has been spearheaded by Ghanaian youth calling for infrastructure, political and economic change in their country. They have raised their voices on social media and in protest on Ghana’s streets. Ewura Adwoa Larbi, a Correspondent from Ghana highlights the concerns of both protestors and counter campaigners. She also questions whether the campaign can prompt the changes that Ghana needs.

 

#Fixthecountry began on social media in the early days of May 2021 and garnered massive support from young Ghanaians locally and internationally. Influencers, celebrities and civilians called on the government to address youth unemployment and underemployment, the high cost of living, dilapidated roads,  and corruption. For days,Ghana’s social,political and economic failures trended on Twitter.

Groups seeking to politicise the campaign were strongly discouraged, as activists insisted that the of the#Fixthecountry movement was a cry that had begun with independence and had wailed its way through different governments over the years.

 The #Fixthecountry protesters took to the streets of Ghana on the  country’s August 4 Founders’ Day after organizers won a court battle that allowed them to protest.

 In response to #Fixthecountry, a counter movement #Fixyourself has also emerged.Its supports have been arguing that citizens are part of Ghana’s problem and need to fix their negative mindsets and take personal responsibility for their behaviours if the country is to successfully address its challenges.

Unsurprisingly, some citizens deem the #Fixthecountry pointless. But could this campaign be the catalyst that Ghana needs to start righting the wrongs?

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Photo Credit: Al Jazeera

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About Ewura Adwoa Larbi: I’m a tertiary student studying animal biology and conservation science. My passions include nature and human and animal interactions.

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth Youth Programme. Articles are published in a spirit of dialogue, respect and understanding. If you disagree, why not submit a response?
To learn more about becoming a Commonwealth Correspondent please visit: http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/submit-articles

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