Rate this
0 (0 votes)
“Young Iraqis around the world care!”
0 out of 5 based on 0 user ratings

“Young Iraqis around the world care!”

Ahmad SamirYoung Iraqi change-makers across the globe are helping to transform the fortunes of their nation, says Ahmad Samir, a Correspondent and Australia Regional Coordinator of I CARE.

It has been ten years since the U.S.-led invasion in Iraq, and young Iraqis everywhere are tired of remaining idle. Despite today’s difficult circumstances, they are achieving extraordinary feats with the help of conferences like TEDxBaghdad, which bring together optimistic change-makers.

The rise in the use of social media in Iraq and the increased number of avenues for young leaders to engage each other have assisted them to give back to their communities. The majority of them also now see volunteer work as a way to help rebuild their country after a decade of decline.

One prominent change initiative is an international charity named I CARE (Iraqi Children’s Aid & Repair Endeavour). I CARE was founded by Dr. Assil Russel in New Zealand. The non-profit, which aims to provide medical and dental aid to disadvantaged Iraqi children, has nudged university medical students to act, for the only way Iraq will heal itself is if people act today and show others in their communities that they truly care.

The team at I CARE has worked tirelessly in hosting events and promoting oral and general health on the streets of Baghdad. Members of the team have given up their time to give back to their communities. A vivid illustration of this was a fundraiser for children with special needs and disabilities held at the Hamzah Centre for Disabilities in Yarmouk, Baghdad.

The event included a screening of the short film ‘Messi Baghdad’ and an appearance by two champion paralympians. Free wheelchairs and crutches were distributed alongside other donations. You may think that such events have little impact on Iraqi citizens, but such gestures speak a lot about the characters that have blossomed under war. These young Iraqis now have a thirst for philanthropy which is interesting in a society such as Iraq’s. It is a clear indicator that Iraq is heading in the right direction and that people living there are seeking a brighter future.

It is refreshing to see young people take their time to organise meetings, raise funds and host events despite stifling hardships and lack of support. Many of the volunteers at I CARE are also TEDxBaghdad volunteers, indicating their drive to meet other young leaders such as themselves. They may be small in number but together they have a huge impact on Iraqi society today. Such individuals really deserve more recognition for the change they have ignited. We have Shahad Al-Ebadi, a TEDxBaghdad team leader and I CARE’s regional coordinator in Iraq to thank for leading the team in Baghdad, which has hosted many successful events with many requesting to volunteer for the initiative.

Everywhere I travel, I come across Iraqis living abroad who are desperate to help their home country. At the recent launch of the Australian branch of I CARE, a documentary screening was held depicting the health care situation in Iraq. Many burst into tears. There were requests to help out in any way and new ideas were brought to the table by young leaders, similar to those we found in Baghdad. I’m so happy to see that Iraqis all around the world truly care!

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
To learn more about I CARE, please visit www.iraqicare.org or email us on  contact@icare.org.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
Note: The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth Youth Programme. All articles are published in a spirit of improving dialogue, respect and understanding. If you disagree, why not submit a response?
To learn more about becoming a Commonwealth Correspondent please click here.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments