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“Not enough reason to celebrate Independence Day”
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“Not enough reason to celebrate Independence Day”

Naseema PerveenPakistan recently marked its Independence Day but Naseema Perveen, 22, a Commonwealth Correspondent from Islamabad in Pakistan, says continuing issues of poverty and violence undermine the sense of celebration. 

On the way to work this morning I had to get public transport.

Two men sitting at the back seat started using bad language with each other over some misconception, and one said to the other, “You people are burden on the nation. If you were not, then Pakistan would have been far better.”

I was astonished to see this whole situation. All the way I thought about their words. On a day in which the other nations celebrate enthusiastically and greet each other, we have such a stage of one condemning the existence of the other.

Pakistan is a country which strives for food, security, and above all for existence. Nations across the world celebrate because they are provided with all the basic necessities, they have their life security, and are given education. Pakistan has been called the danger zone for life, where as far as dropouts are concerned seven million children of primary level are out of school, where in the case of poverty every one person amongst four is living below the poverty line.

I can sense the smell in the air, the frightening horror, the crying voices, and the moans of disappointment which my home land suffers. It needs security, it needs food, and it needs peace above all. Quaid was meant to make Pakistan not because he wanted a separated home land, but a country where Muslims can practice their faith, where they can spread love, where there would be sharing of knowledge. But alas this nation continues to have extreme poverty, people do not have food to eat, they do not have a home to live in, they lack everyday necessities and above all they are claiming each other’s lives because of religious basis.

Being debtors of the world financial institutions, IMF and the WB, along with all other social evils, should we celebrate Independence Day? Does Independence means getting a piece of land where corruption would be touching skies, where a rule of thumb is that the rich will be richer and the poorer will become poorer? Does Independence means that a child of a poor man cannot have the basic necessities at any cost, provided a child of the rich man is enjoying a luxurious life? Do I have enough right to celebrate Independence where my mother land is shedding tears of blood? The bloodshed and the unrest across the country and at the borders means it has become the most dangerous country for life.

I am ashamed the whole country is celebrating Independence even though life is not secured. On its Independence Day the night of the 13th August a blast in Karachi killed two and injured several. If this means Independence then all the dictionaries across the world should change their definition, but if Independence is getting all your basic necessities of life then my nation is still in slumber. There is complete failure, and they should declare themselves to have failed in administering this country. For the loss and the corruption it is suffering, my heart bleeds for Pakistan.

What we can do on an individual capacity is to change our own ways. Let us promise ourselves to play the best part in our surroundings wherever we live, because Pakistan needs our efforts and our affection. We need to join hands to take over poverty, illiteracy and make a place where we can smell peace in our surroundings, so that a day will come when the people will greet each other on Independence Day.

Thus I realized it was not their individual fault those men behaved as they did, but it was due to the suffocation and the suffering they are going through. And yes, Pakistan cries!

photo credit: Edge of Space via photopin cc

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About me:

I am blogger, writer, and a social person; I am a responsible, trust-worthy and friendly person. My aim in writing is to address social issues, many of which remain unnoticed. 

 I am a student at the School of Economics, Quaid-i-AzamUniversity, Islamabad, aspiring to make my career in social development as a social worker. I have passion to work with people from all walks of life and believe social development is only possible through common effort and consultation.

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Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth Youth Programme. Articles are published in a spirit of dialogue, respect and understanding. If you disagree, why not submit a response?

To learn more about becoming a Commonwealth Correspondent please visit: http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/submit-articles/commonwealthcorrespondents/

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