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“I am committed to the development of my people”
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“I am committed to the development of my people”

Naseema Perveen

The poor man is suffering in Pakistan, says Naseema Perveen, 21, a Commonwealth Correspondent from Islamabad in Pakistan, who questions why the nation’s policy makers seem indifferent to the plight of the people. She boldly asserts her commitment to effect the much-needed change her nation desperately needs.

And thus I have decided to work for others, because humanity means working for others not just for self. There are many things going on around us: I wonder what the policy makers are doing behind the scenes.

Every day when I step out of my home, I see thousands of the people begging, children picking garbage, poor seeking help, and orphans seeking food. The unequal distribution of resources and power is one of the main reasons for the lack of progress in a Third World country, which obviously gives birth to the vicious circle of poverty.

And with the passage of time the poor becomes poorer and rich becomes richer, which widens the gap of the different classes in the economy. This is a bad omen for development.

What does development mean?  It is sustainable improvement in the standard of living of the people. So a developing country must work towards consistent growth in all sectors, particularly health and education, to achieve significant economic development.

The practice of having temporary shelter is common in Pakistan: people rely on temporary shelters for their residence. Any destruction caused by flood or any other natural disaster forces them to move: this indicates many people lack shelter, and even food and education. Lack of infrastructure and transportation are other issues for the common man.

Do policy makers and those in authority feel this dilemma? I don’t think so, perhaps because they have been not gone through these pains of a common man who walks in the boiling weather to the office and to avail the overcrowded public transport. Those who have never faced such a dilemma cannot understand the pains of the common man.

What they are supposed to do is to make the economy better. But do they play this role? Do they realize the impact of what they are doing? These and many other questions which remain unanswered go through my mind, but I do not find solution other than questioning my own.  If I get a chance to be in authority, I will do my best to mobilize all resources towards common development.

A country needs to go through several stages as it becomes developed, but once it starts the journey, it runs consistently and available resources can be pooled towards further progress. After several years, it reaches the final stage of development, where it needs not take major steps. Here, its progress flows at a certain rate on its own. After it has been set on the right path, it works as an automated process. The natural forces in the economy sustain it even when unpredictable situations occur.

Though public welfare is not private goods and neither is it the responsibility of an individual to provide it, it is the responsibility of government or the central authority to ensure the lives of the people are better. Public welfare means considering how to raise the income level and the standard of living of the people.  Providing shelter, social infrastructure and transport systems for the people are also public goods. They must be refined to benefit the people.

Every day when I return home from work, I feel sorry for many people and wonder if I can do something for them. I will convey my message to the ones who can only wait for the development that will happen in my country soon.

I am confident enough to say that when I become one of the economists of my country, I will play an important role to serve the people so that my home land could also be on the path of prosperity and development.

I always hope and wish for it. I have imagined it, and expect that my dreams will come true. And thus I have decided to dedicate myself to development.

Photo credit: Carol Mitchell via photopin cc

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About me:

I am blogger, writer, and a social person; I am a responsible, trust-worthy and friendly person. My aim in writing is to address social issues, many of which remain unnoticed.

Currently I am a student of Economics, aspiring to make my career in social development as a social worker. I have passion to work with people from all walks of life and believe social development is only possible through common effort and consultation.

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Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth Youth Programme. Articles are published in a spirit of dialogue, respect and understanding. If you disagree, why not submit a response?

To learn more about becoming a Commonwealth Correspondent please visit: http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/submit-articles/commonwealthcorrespondents/

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