Rate this
5 (1 votes)
"A testament on poverty enlightment"
5 out of 5 based on 1 user ratings

"A testament on poverty enlightment"

Pax Nvani picEfforts to reduce poppy production in Afghanistan have shown little result, writes Pax Nvani, 25, a Correspondent from Eket in Nigeria, who argues for an approach that uses understanding as well as cash.

Afghanistan is reportedly the world leader in opium production, with approximately ninety-three per cent of the illicit production, generating revenue equivalent to about thirteen per cent of the country’s gross domestic product.

In (2004) USAID/Afghanistan launched a program to provide an economic alternative to the production of the opium poppy in Afghanistan, in which the total allocation amounted to millions of US dollars representing 97.51 per cent of the estimated value.

In providing alternative livelihoods, the mission has had little impact on the overall strategy for reducing poppy production as rate of increase is still high, according to United Nations reports.

Millions of opportunities have been put in the hands of the poor, yet poverty still persists. Poverty encompasses more than just hunger, poor health, or political repression. Socio-economic opportunity will always fall upon men and women who are part of the “enlightenment”.

Given this, it requires a lot of effort to grow opium poppy. Extra labour and risk are required to cultivate the illicit crop, meaning that poppy farming can be ranked as one of the main sources of financial insecurity.

However, it’s hard to find a farmer who does not grow it in the region. The poor will protect their asset. Any alternative created to change their understanding will perhaps go a long way by emphasising on the risk or uncertainty about the intending change, with indicators comparing it to any present understanding.

An enterprising farmer cultivating opium for about twenty years is aware of the risk, uncertainty, market availability, high value and shelf life of the illicit crop, and views it as insurance against turmoil in coming years.

In a glimmer of good news, poverty as a social negative can be minimized. If intervention programs can be focused more on “enlightenment”, the poor will see the need for change and also sustain the change.

photo credit: United Nations Photo via photopin cc
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

About me: I am a finance and tax associate, a self-starter with proven finance background. Combined with a degree in financial management and a certificate in descriptive statistics, I am interested in financial analysis, decision making and challenges on global poverty.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth Youth Programme. Articles are published in a spirit of dialogue, respect and understanding. If you disagree, why not submit a response?
To learn more about becoming a Commonwealth Correspondent please visit: http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/submit-articles/commonwealthcorrespondents/
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments