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“Racism continues, hidden and unintentionally”
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“Racism continues, hidden and unintentionally”

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Abdullah al Hasan photoIt’s easy to oppose racism, but as Abdullah Al Hasan, 23, a Commonwealth Correspondent from Dhaka in Bangladesh, points out, lingering prejudices can undermine the effort to achieve equality.

We live in a world where we raise our voices for the things – and yet we don’t even try to change those very things in our own lives. We know how to protest but don’t dig out something if it is deeply rooted. Racism is one of such things.

Yes, everyone detests racism. We don’t stand it. We like to upbraid racists; we like to rebuke people when they practice racism. Newspapers, TV and social media- everything stands against racism.

It looks lofty for sure, but the question still remains: How many of us have really taken it seriously?

Surreptitiously and unintentionally, we all practice racism whether we concede it or not. This happens mostly because of our obsolete mental and social structures. Racism can have different shapes. It doesn’t necessarily mean that racism can only be picked out when someone practices it outright; it may be detected in many smaller matters that we have never considered.

Let me begin with a brief definition of racism. The actual meaning is to distinguish people one from another by taking certain characteristics into account. Later, it pushes us to treat people in a different manner because of those differences.

What a shame! We all are human beings. We all deserve to be treated as human beings. We should have the same rights, responsibilities and chances. We should never categorize and classify people regarding their physical qualities, colour, or that sort of difference.

If we dig out how we practice racism inwardly and indirectly we see that even while standing against racism we are gutless to get over it entirely. For example, you’re going to hire someone in your office and finally you’ve got two people eligible for the post. One of them is better looking than the other, so you just hire that person without considering other things that might change your decision. This is a type of racism.

You go to attend a program with your friends. Everyone is taking pictures. There are children over there. You select the most beautiful child over others to take a picture with; don’t you think this is racism? Yes, it is.

A girl is in a trouble just before you. Now, if you waver about helping her because she’s not so beautiful, you are a racist. Or, if you don’t help someone just because that person is from the lower part of society, you’re bringing up racism.

In many countries, only fair-skinned girls are considered beautiful. If you pay attention to the advertisements for skin-lightening creams in those countries, you will wake up to the fact that everyone is trying to prove that only fair skin means beauty!

There’s another point. Let’s keep this fair-skinned theory aside. Why does someone even need to be beautiful? Everyone is beautiful in her or his own way. When you’re suggesting to someone how to be beautiful, you’re apparently saying that person is not beautiful and you feel s/he should be. Undoubtedly you’re practicing racism.

Now, does it seem so hard to demolish racism? No, it does not. If you start judging a person considering only her or his idiosyncrasies apart from their looks, you can fight back against racism. Elevate your mentality and way of thinking. Humans are valuable creatures on this planet, so everyone deserves the same assessment.

You might change someone’s colour, but can you change her or his personality using a cosmetic cream? No, you can’t. And, at the end of the day, this is the only thing that does matter.

Before judging someone, first consider what will happen if you go abroad? If they mock you, if they belittle you for your skin colour, how will you take it? Will you bear this? If not, then think about the people you’re treating this way!

In your office, you have to hire people who are effective and efficient enough. You have to find out and select the smartest employees to get into work.

If someone falls in a trouble before you, try to help her or him as a human being. If you are unable to help that person, make sure your inability does not emerge from racism.

Children are the most precious gifts of God. To have a better future, to have a racism-free future, we have to let them sprout up in a society where nothing makes them believe that they are not equal to each other!

These are some examples of surreptitious racism. In every sector we should treat people with equality. There’s no space for racism. It’s high time we took this into serious consideration. Let’s make this whole world a better place to live, let’s share everything together, let’s smile together.

Photo: http://mrg.bz/dHpU1l
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About me:

Hi I’m from Bangladesh, the green land. Currently I’m studying marketing at North South University, Dhaka. I love to explore human minds. Writing is my favourite pastime. I always try to do research about people, politics, metaphysics, English and marketing.

I’m just an ordinary guy with some extra-ordinary dreams to be fulfilled. I believe a moment staying with family is just worth living. Friends are my oxygen.

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Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth Youth Programme. Articles are published in a spirit of dialogue, respect and understanding. If you disagree, why not submit a response?

To learn more about becoming a Commonwealth Correspondent please visit: http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/submit-articles/commonwealthcorrespondents/

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