Rate this
4 (1 votes)
“Defining the change that Nigerians want”
4 out of 5 based on 1 user ratings

“Defining the change that Nigerians want”

26670429560_70dd7a4de8_b

Bryan ObajiNational elections can heighten the appetite for change, writes Bryan Obaji, 25, a Correspondent from Calabar in Nigeria, who examines the changes Nigerians want so that their country can reach its leadership potential.  

Change for many people could mean different things whether positive or negative, depending on the way an individual sees it or is willing to relate with it. In the political calculations of most Nigerians, when they try to define the ‘change’ in the slogan of the ruling party, they see the word as an automatic turnaround of things in Nigeria.

To the common man, it might be the best word Nigeria has spoken since independence, but to the political class it’s just a strategy to win an election. Quite frankly, when the idea of change first emerged in Nigeria, no one ever took it seriously, going by the normal campaign promises, but when a retired general, a man both feared and loved, spearheads such philosophy then we are in for serious business.

Whatever strategy was employed to make sure the opposition won the election is inconsequential to most Nigerians. All the people want is a changed Nigeria – a country where everyone is accountable no matter the responsibility you are given, and one that functions in the right way, just like many advanced nations.

The change the people seek is not just that of an opposition political party succeeding in a historic election, but one where you deliver on your promises and consequently government acts in a more responsible manner. The people believe strongly in the possibility of the word ‘change’ because they have strong faith in the government they voted into power.

But one wonders what exactly should change in Nigeria – what exactly do the people really want?

We want a country where corruption, which has eaten deep into the fabric of the country, is unceremoniously eradicated in totality. Corrupt practices have enabled many public officers to amass wealth for themselves and generations they probably will never live to see. This very wicked and greedy act has seen a once-promising nation plunge into high profile debts and economic instability, killing promising businesses and making nonsense of government policies.

We want a change in the governance of this great nation. No leader should lead based on ethnic divides or religious lines or even personal relationship with individuals. The country needs to move forward simply by consolidating the ideas of our founding fathers, who wanted a nation that will enormously care for her citizens and play leadership roles in Africa and beyond.

We want a change in the over-reliance on crude oil. There should be diversification into other promising sectors, rather than reling solely on one revenue point to cater for over 150 million people. We can go on to write a thousand things we need to change, or can even say the entire system should be overhauled if that will bring the desired change we Nigerians want. One thing nevertheless is certain; if we act well we definitely will see changed results.

In today’s highly critical world, many people will attempt to compare nations regarding where they were and where they are now. And it is not surprising that in a hugely divided country like Nigeria, where patience is so less affordable, a number of people are beginning to wonder if the government they elected to bring change is any different from its predecessor. While the administration’s core loyalists are running to its defence and asking for more time, it is important for them to note that many – especially the agitated young – voted to see change quickly. I personally think there is no better time to make things happen than the time the people believe change can really come. All that needs to be done should be done to ensure we move in the right direction.

It’s no longer time to be complacent; we have the machinery and man power to ensure things are put in place at the right time and in the necessary areas. When we rise up to our responsibilities as a nation, we can curb external manoeuvres that could cripple our economy. We truly are a great nation, despite our recklessness and misplaced priorities there is still a ray of hope. We know where we’ve erred, and if we sit back and reorganise ourselves, then the giants in us will take Africa places.

photo credit: Break Free Nigeria action at Oloibiri Well 1 via photopin (license)

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

About me: I am Jetem Bryan Obaji, a trained accountant. Presently, I work for a not-for- profit organisation, sensitising the public on the need for basic education.

In the coming years I hope to channel my efforts and resources towards ensuring a better quality of life for people. Reading, writing and playing fun games are my interests.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth Youth Programme. Articles are published in a spirit of dialogue, respect and understanding. If you disagree, why not submit a response?

To learn more about becoming a Commonwealth Correspondent please visit: http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/submit-articles/commonwealthcorrespondents/

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

 

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments