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“Facing resistance and gender-based discrimination”
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“Facing resistance and gender-based discrimination”

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Alicia Wallace picThe tradition of gender-based discrimination is being challenged in the Bahamas, writes Alicia Wallace, 29, a Correspondent from Nassau, Bahamas, who describes activism in support of equality.

Known for its sun, sea, and sand, The Bahamas has a dirty little secret. Sexism lives and thrives in this chain of islands, supported by the constitution and laws of the land.

In the last quarter of 2013, I decided to start a local branch of Hollaback! – a global movement and non-profit organization based in New York City and operating in over 90 cities – to end street harassment. I have been experiencing sexual harassment in public spaces in varying forms and degrees since the age of eight. The first time it happened, I was with my mother, and the offender was at least 40 years old. I was embarrassed, frightened, and shocked. That’s the day I consciously started acting to avoid gender-based violence.

Just before the official launch of Hollaback! Bahamas, a Member of Parliament made a non-joke in the House of Assembly about a former partner he physically abused. Not only were his remarks infuriating, but the reception he got was beyond disappointing. His colleagues, other Members of Parliament and the Speaker of the House remained silent, laughed, or dismissed his remarks as a joke. I could not imagine being his victim, twice: physical violated, then laughed at by dozens of people elected to represent the people of this country. Something had to be done.

The first action by Hollaback! Bahamas was a letter to the editors of local newspapers in response to the MP’s comments. We joined with four other organizations to form Coalition to End Gender-based Violence & Discrimination. We submitted a reasonable proposal to the Government of The Bahamas requesting meetings with law enforcement, updates to the Family Life curriculum in schools, and support for the Violence is Not Funny campaign. Our proposal, sent directly to the Prime Minister and the Minister of Social Services, was ignored. We then started an online petition, organized a peaceful protest, and held a public forum on gender-based violence. We faced great resistance in our efforts, but did not back down.

My current work is youth-focused, centered around the development of sustainable summer and after-school programming. The objectives of the programs are education, engagement and empowerment of our youth. Part of the curriculum is zeroing in on issues of gender with a particular focus on the gender equality referendum, which is about to be postponed for the fifth time in two years. Equality Bahamas has been working to educate the general public on issues of gender and, specifically, the four proposed constitutional amendment bills which address issues of conferring citizenship and discrimination on the basis of sex.

Issues of gender in The Bahamas are deeply rooted, and it will likely take an entire generation to make the cultural shift necessary for gender equality and the eradication of gender-based violence. As a young feminist, activist, writer, and public educator, my work continues, regardless of the whims of political actors or the social temperature. While change is inevitable, commitment and access to and use of resources determines timing. May our efforts combine, crossing socioeconomic, geographic, and generational boundaries, to end gender-based violence.

This article was first published in Young Feminist Wire

photo credit: Stop and listen via photopin (license)
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About me: I am a writer and blogger living and working in Nassau, Bahamas. I’m a women’s rights activist and youth advocate. Trained in economics and finance, I believe improving the educational system will result in a higher rate of civic participation. My work has been in the non-profit world. I am Director of Hollaback! Bahamas, a global movement to end street harassment, co-founder of Coalition to End Gender-based Violence & Discrimination, and Director of Equality Bahamas’ educational campaign

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Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth Youth Programme. Articles are published in a spirit of dialogue, respect and understanding. If you disagree, why not submit a response?

To learn more about becoming a Commonwealth Correspondent please visit:
http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/submit-articles/commonwealthcorrespondents/

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