Rate this
0 (0 votes)
"Day of the African Child – a world at school"
0 out of 5 based on 0 user ratings

"Day of the African Child – a world at school"

Musa TemidayoDay of the African Child remembers the 1976 protests by Soweto school children against the poor quality of their education. But as Musa Temidayo, 23, a Commonwealth Correspondent from Nigeria and Global Youth Ambassador for A World At School writes, the day also highlights continuing education needs in Africa.

On 16 June every year, the African Union and its Partners worldwide celebrate the Day of the African Child (DAC), in admiration of the 1976 protests led by school children in Soweto, South Africa. The students as at then protested against the poor quality of their education and demanding their right to be taught in their own language and also to the education system designed to further the purposes of the apartheid regime. The brutal response of the apartheid security agencies to the unarmed students’ protests resulted in the death of more than a hundred students. The 1976 protests contributed greatly to the eventual collapse of the apartheid regime. Fifteen years later, the African Union Assembly passed a resolution designating 16 June as a Day for the celebration of the African child.

This day, we are joined by 480 other young advocates, in a global alliance, to get 57 million out-of-school and 250 million unlearning children into school and learning. Together, we constitute the Global Youth Ambassadors group that was launched on April 1, 2014 by the United Nations Secretary-General, Bank Ki Moon, and the United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education, Gordon Brown.

In Nigeria, our kids alone make up 18.4 per cent of the entire out-of-school children globally, figuratively about 10.5 million children. A sizeable number of these children fall within the pre-primary, primary and secondary school levels of formal education, while a huge number of them do not have access to education in whatever form. This can be linked to various factors ranging girl discrimination, non-protection of the right of marginalized children, inaction of the government to provide accessible schools for children in some remote areas amongst others.

Today, we are taking a number of campaigns drawing the attention of the government and the world to issues that confront the African child. Inspired by the momentous occasion of Malala Day in 2013, when young people took over the United Nations Headquarters in New York and demanded the passing of a Youth Resolution to secure the safety of education, the Youth Takeover of the African Union will be held in solidarity with the abducted schoolgirls from Chibok Village in Nigeria, with a flagship event in Ethiopia. In collaboration with major organisations in the education community, we will call for a renewed commitment from world leaders to the right to education for every boy and girl.

In Lagos, by 12 noon, young minds will be discussing about “The challenges of being an African Child trying to get an Education and The way forward” Action Health Incorporated (17, Lawal Street Off Oweh Street, Jibowu, lagos). Likewise in Niger state, project #ZeroExclusion will be launched with pre event campaign which started on the 13th with Schools along Abuja express way Kaduna and Main event on the 16th at the Federal University of Technology, Minna, Niger state.

As we celebrate the Day of the African Child, we stand in solidarity with those children who marched with conviction and courage in Soweto in 1976, for they have invoked a powerful reminder of our decisive role in being a catalyst for change. Today, we have the opportunity to move a step closer to giving those 57 million out-of-school and 250 million unlearning children into school giving them the true right to education that they deserve and creating a new bright future for them.

We thank you in anticipation of your support to save the future of all children.

photo credit: World Bank Photo Collection via photopin cc

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

About me: I am from Nigeria, currently studying International Relations at Obafemi Awolowo University Ile-Ife Osun state. I’m also the Editor-in- Chief for the department. I love travelling and singing, and have  interest in Management and Developmental Issues.

Aside from studying, I work as as the Chairman of my department’s magazine. I want to be a Manager-Human Resource & Conflict Management, and also hope to serve in the Nigerian foreign service.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth Youth Programme. Articles are published in a spirit of dialogue, respect and understanding. If you disagree, why not submit a response.
To learn more about becoming a Commonwealth Correspondent please visit: http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/submit-articles/commonwealthcorrespondents/

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments